Tag Archives: animals

Object of the Month – October 2020

New Zealand Kiwi

We’ve been busy over the last few weeks moving the bird taxidermy from a temporary home back to their usual store. October’s object of the month is a mounted kiwi skin, probably of a little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii), the smallest of the five kiwi species.

A stuffed Little spotted kiwi sking, facing left, mounted on a 'naturalistic' base.

The little spotted kiwi in Saffron Walden Museum. © SWM

With strong, heavy legs and no wings, kiwis have evolved for life on the ground. They are nocturnal, dig burrows to nest in, and have stiff, hair-like outer feathers to withstand pushing through leaves and twigs. Unlike most birds they have keen hearing and a good sense of smell to help them find food, mostly earthworms and insects.

A page from a book with drawings showing the head, wing and strong feet of a kiwi.

Kiwis have ‘whiskers’ around their beak, stiff feathers and tiny wings, and strong feet for digging.
[Internet Archive Book Images / No restrictions]

Kiwi numbers have plummeted since Europeans arrived in New Zealand, bringing rats, stoats, pigs, cats, dogs, trophy hunting and habitat destruction. Kiwis grow and reproduce slowly and only thrive today on protected reserves, with intensive work to remove these threats. The indigenous Maori regard the kiwi as a taonga (treasure), and actively protect the birds across 230,000 hectares of land, about the same area as the national government’s Department of Conservation. Altogether, an area of land bigger than Essex is managed for kiwi conservation.

Coloured map of New Zealand showing distribution of kiwis at present day and before European colonisation.

Light green, current location of kiwis; Dark green, location of kiwis before European colonisation; Dark grey, kiwis never known here. [© New Zealand Department of Conservation]

Map with numbers and letters showing locations of Little spotted kiwi populations across New Zealand.

Little spotted kiwi reserves – Predator-free islands: 1, Hen Island; 2, Tiritiri Matangi; 3. Red Mercury Island; 4, Motuihe Island; 5, Kapiti Island; 6, Long Island; 7, Anchor Island; 8, Chalky Island
Mainland: A, Shakespear Open Sanctuary; B, Cape Sanctuary; C, Zealandia.
Michal Klajban / CC BY-SA 4.0

See the little spotted kiwi and find out more about kiwi species in our Object of the Month display when the museum re-opens soon.

More information
New Zealand Department of Conservation (DoC) –  Facts about kiwi: https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/birds/birds-a-z/kiwi/facts/
New Zealand DoC – Little Spotted Kiwi: https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/birds/birds-a-z/kiwi/little-spotted-kiwi/
New Zealand DoC – Kiwi: https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/birds/birds-a-z/kiwi/
Science Learning Hub – Conserving our native kiwi: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/2784-conserving-our-native-kiwi
WWF New Zealand – Kiwi: https://www.wwf.org.nz/what_we_do/species/kiwi/

References

Internet Archive Book Images. ‘Features of kiwis’ Transactions and proceedings of the New Zealand Institute (1870). Internet Archive Book Images / No restrictions. Available from commons.wikimedia.org [Accessed 29.9.2020]

Michal Klajban. ‘Apteryx owenii – distribution map. CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0). Available from commons.wikimedia.org [Accessed 29.2.2020]

New Zealand Department of Conservation. Kiwi Recovery Plan Summary Document 2018-2028. New Zealand Government, 2018. Available from https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-animals/birds/birds-a-z/kiwi/docs-work/ [Accessed 29.9.2020]

Half-term at the Museum

Half term week saw the museum busy with children engaged in activities on Tuesday and Thursday for our “Down on the Farm” week, linked to our current exhibition From the Hazely Brick Earth: Agriculture in North-West Essex. The activities organised by our Education and Outreach Officer, Charlotte, and supported by learning volunteers, Jane Laing, Jeanette Fulcher and Jane Evans, proved popular with our regular visitors as well as many who were visiting the museum for the first time.

On Tuesday visitors could make Salt-Dough animals and on Thursday they made Pom Pom animals.

The salt dough was especially popular, (though perhaps not so popular with our lovely cleaner who had to remove some tricky spots from the carpet the following day!). Although the idea was to make farm animals, the children let their imaginations run riot and produced all sorts of exotic creatures using the cutter provided as well as a few free style creations, including a 3D sloth on a palm tree! Sadly, there is no photographic evidence of that particular creation!

There was also a Long-Horn Cow Trail taking the children to nearly every part of the museum to search for the cardboard cows that were ‘grazing’ there and to find the answers to the questions on each cow. The cows can still be seen grazing around the museum and the trail will be available until our next activities in Easter.

On Thursday the activity was to create pom pom animals. Again the aim initially was to create farm animals but an exotic menagerie was soon created, including more dinosaurs, a flamingo, some terrifying spiders and a giraffe. Featured in the photo are Dave and Gary, a pair of rather jolly pom pom diplodocus!

For the first time this half term the activities could be pre-booked and there was a charge of £1.50 per child for the 30 minute activity. This system will operate for all our holiday activities in future to allow us to provide better quality activates and enable visitors to pre-book in the weeks before the event to guarantee a slot.

The next activity days will be during the Easter holidays on Tuesday 3 April and Thursday 12 April. On Tuesday 3 April, the theme will be Brilliant Books, when children will have the opportunity to create a concertina book and write their own story. On Thursday 12 April our Spring Day activity will be to make a yarn sheep. On both days there will be free activities running alongside the pre-booked activity – Animal Stories in the Natural History gallery on 3 April and on an Animal Trail on 12 April.

For more information about our programme of events, see our Upcoming Events page or take a look at our programme